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The Occasional Diarist – 26 May 2009

Tuesday 26th May 2009 15:47
The last few days have been difficult, I have to drive myself very hard to get things done at times like these. It is made especially so, when some projects that looked so attractive before, and had been set about with vigour and enthusiasm, now appear pointless, ill-considered and at best naive. With the benefit of hindsight however, I’ve learned not to abandon these, but rather to set them aside for ‘review’, because I’ve found that there’s usually some part of a project that either has merit in itself, or can be converted (morphed) into something that has.

Way back when I was at school, I was very keen on books. I was encouraged to read at a very early age by my father, and could read most things when I started school. This gave me a tremendous ‘boost’, and for most of the rest of my time at school, I was a year ahead of the children of my own age. Language fascinated me, and books given out to last a term were usually read within a matter of days, which made me very popular with at least one English Language teacher. I also found I could write essays and stories in a way that others would enjoy – A big fan was my father, who normally pounced on my english homework when it was finished, and spend 10 minutes or so, reading it and laughing to himself.

For a large part of my adult life, I’ve written – mostly technical work, but always had a hankering to re-visit earlier days and write short stories. To complete the circle then, I’ve tried putting down some of the stories going around in my head, but whilst I thought this was worthwhile when writing these – it is now apparent to me, that most of what I wanted to say has been said already, and a number of these works will probably never see the light of day. I should probably stick to documenting my technical projects – that is a field where I know just exctly what to say, and what to leave out. Putting it more bluntly – the stories are mostly a collection of cliches – sad ones at that.

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